Extensive Reading Bibliography

Yu, V. W-S. (1997). Encouraging Students to Read More in an Extensive Reading Programme. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 1-10) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

204--**In Chapter 1, Vivienne Wai-Sze Yu provides us with insights into the design of a large-scale extensive reading programme involving 149 Hong Kong secondary schools. Key components of this design include the full integration of extensive reading into the curriculum, an adequate supply of books that match students' reading levels and interests, an easy-to-use, quick feedback system which lets students check their own comprehension, teachers who act as facilitators and enthusiasts for the programme (including reading at the same time as students), and the creation of an overall reading culture in the schools.

 

Tup, F. & Shu, L. (1997). "First World - Third World": Two Extensive Reading Programmes at Secondary Level. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 10-24) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

205--**In Chapter 2, Faridah Tup and Lydia Shu describe extensive reading programmes at their schools in Singapore and Cameroon, respectively. While the income levels of their countries differ greatly, their extensive reading programmes share common elements. These include a system for grading the books, tests to diagnose students' reading levels, regularly scheduled time for uninterrupted sustained silent reading, strategies for helping students to read, and means of monitoring of students' reading. How these elements are implemented differs with the particularities of the school and the country.

 

Lituanas, P. M. (1997) Collecting Materials for Extensive Reading. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 25-29) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

206--**In Chapter 3, Propitas M Lituanas shares some of the strategies she has used to find materials for a classroom extensive reading programme in the Philippines. In developing countries finding adequate materials is very often a major difficulty. Faced with this difficulty, Lituanas did not give up. Based on her experience, she suggests turning for help to former and current students, libraries, fellow teachers, parents, businesses, foundations, community organizations, and government officials.

 

Smith, R. (1997). Transforming a Non-Reading Culture. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 30-43) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

207--**In Chapter 4, Robin Smith describes how an extensive reading programme in Brunei Darussalam helped to bring about a change in the whole way secondary students thought about reading. Whereas previously students read to memorize without necessarily understanding, extensive reading helped them read for meaning and to read for pleasure, not just for classwork. Smith explains the various strategies that he and his colleagues used. These strategies included reading aloud, setting up a self-access room, obtaining appropriate materials, and communicating with fellow teachers, parents, and with educators at the primary schools from which the students came.

 

Jurkovac, J. (1997). Organizing School Wide Reading Campaigns. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 44-54) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

208--**In Chapter 5, Jeffrey Jurkovac explains the strategies his school in Colombia uses to organize an annual campaign to encourage extensive reading of multi-cultural literature. Jurkovac provides a detailed time line of the various tasks to be performed before and during the campaign. Additionally, there are calendars of various events planned to excite students and their family members to actively participate. Jurkovac also includes a list of books that describe other fun activities to promote extensive reading.

 

Kuan, H. S. (1997). Promoting Active Reading Strategies to Help Slow Readers. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 55-64) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

209--**In Chapter 6, HONG Sau Kuan addresses one of the key obstacles to successful extensive reading programmes. Good readers already enjoy reading. Thus, it is not difficult to motivate them to become active participants in extensive reading. Indeed, many of them do extensive reading on their own, regardless of what is happening at school. In contrast, slow readers may dislike reading. Thus, even a well-organized extensive reading programme with large quantities of appropriate materials may not succeed in enticing these reluctant readers to participate. To remedy this concern, Hong describes how she has used various strategies to increase the proficiency of slow readers in a Singapore primary school and, thereby, enhance their interest in reading.

 

Sim-Goh M. L., Cockburn, L. & Isbister, S. (1997). Buddy Reading. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 65-80) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

210--**In Chapter 7, "Buddy Reading" Sim-Goh Moye Luan, Laura Cockburn, and Shona Isbister describe a peer tutoring programme used to promote reading in Singapore primary schools. Some students and parents worry that peer tutoring benefits only the tutees. However, Sim-Goh, Cockburn, and Isbister explain that the tutors benefit also both cognitively and affectively by the application of their knowledge and skills. The chapter illustrates various aspects of Buddy Reading, including: a pair reading script; a guide, a checklist, and a programme for the training of tutors; and instruments for monitoring and evaluating the programme. The chapter concludes with the authors' plans for future development of the programme.

 

Tan, A. L. & Kan, G. Y. (1997). Reading Across the Curriculum. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 81-89) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

211--**In Chapter 8, TAN Aik Ling and KAN Geok Yan share their experiences in guiding a bilingual, Singapore secondary school extensive reading programme. While extensive reading is often thought of as involving strictly the reading of fiction, this schoolwide programme has students reading materials from across the curriculum, with all the content areas contributing. In this way, the programme attempts to broaden students' reading interests. Pupils track their own reading, with teachers following up by such means as thinking questions.

 

McQuillan, J. & Tse, L. (1997). Let's Talk about Books: Using Literature Circles in Second Language Classrooms In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 90-97) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

212--**In Chapter 9, Jeff McQuillan and Lucy Tse describe how they encourage international students studying at a US university to read for pleasure by the use of small, self-selected, student groups which meet regularly to discuss books which students themselves have selected. Although students are working in their Literature Circles without direct instruction from teachers, McQuillan and Tse believe that teachers still have valuable roles. These roles include helping students form groups, advising students on which books to read, assisting with comprehension problems, unobtrusively observing group progress, and assuring students that pleasure reading can indeed promote language acquisition.

 

Hill, M. & Van Horn, L. (1997). Extensive Reading through Book Clubs: How Book Clubs Have Changed Lives. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 98-108) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

213--**In Chapter 10, Margaret H Hill and Leigh Van Horn discuss how students in a US juvenile detention center became hooked on books via their teacher's use of a strategy which brought groups of students together to talk about high interest books. According to Hill and Van Horn, a key ingredient of the Book Club strategy lies in the group discussions. These are real discussions which relate reading to students' lives and values, not exercises where students try to find the right answer defined in advance by the teacher. The authors report that as a result of this meaningful interaction, Book Club helps students bond with one another in a pro-social way.

 

Tiey, H. Y., Idamban, S. & Jacobs, G.M. (1997). Reading Aloud to Students as part of Extensive Reading. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 109-119) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

214--**In Chapter 11, TIEY Huay Yong, Saraswathy Idamban, and George M Jacobs writing from Singapore describe how reading aloud can be integrated into an extensive reading programme. Reading aloud, the authors believe, can help students develop a love for reading, introduce them to new books and genres, increase their language proficiency, improve their listening comprehension, and teach students how to read aloud. Yong, Idamban, and Jacobs provide suggestions on how to choose material for reading aloud and on how to read aloud.

 

Rodgers, T. (1997). Partnerships in Reading and Writing. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 120-127) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

215--**In Chapter 12, Ted Rodgers describes a peer tutoring programme in Malaysia in which older students first read along with their younger partners. Later, the older student leads their partner to write a book in which the younger student is the main character. After a teacher edits the book, the older partner then illustrates it. Finally, the book is presented to the younger student, to be read again and again. Rodgers explains how the programme was set up and includes a sample of how two students worked together to create a book.

 

Derewianka, B.. (1997). Using the Internet for Extensive Reading. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 128-143) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre. .

216--**In Chapter 13, Beverly Derewianka from Australia describes a wide range of techniques and resources for using the vast reaches of the Internet to find and generate materials for extensive reading. Among the many techniques and places on the Internet which Derewianka advises students and teachers to explore are: Keypals, the Internet equivalent of penpals; Chatrooms, where the fingers do the talking and the eyes do the listening; Learning Networks, which link students and teachers working together on a particular task or project; and Discussion Lists and Newsgroups, global forums for people with like interests to share ideas.

 

Davidson, C., Ogle, D, Ross, D., Tuhaka, J. & Ng, S. M. (1997). Student-Created Reading Materials for Extensive Reading. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 144-160) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre. .

217--**In Chapter 14, Colin Davidson, Dianne Ogle, Denise Ross, Jakki Tuhaka, and Ng Seok Moi describe a wide range of strategies they use for helping students in a New Zealand primary school to generate materials for themselves, their teachers, and their fellow students to read. Such student-generated materials help achieve the teachers' goal of encouraging their students to "write like readers and read like writers", because once you have written a book or other text of your own for a real audience, your whole view of the reading-writing process changes.

 

Lie, A. (1997). The Reading and Writing Connection: Community Journal. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 161-170) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

218--**In Chapter 15, Anita Lie describes an extensive reading programme in Indonesia which encourages students to read literature by use of a community journal, an adaptation on dialogue journals. After students have read a literary work of their choice, they write a journal entry summarizing the work and giving a personal reflection on it. Peers then write responses on the entries. Many experts on extensive reading believe that a key element of successful programmes is the participation of teachers as active readers. In keeping with this concept, Lie participates in the community journal in the same way as her students.

 

Dupuy, B. & McQuillan, J. (1997). Handcrafted Books: Two for the Price of One. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 171-180) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre. .

219--**In Chapter 16, Beatrice Dupuy and Jeff McQuillan explain how US students of French as a foreign language create extensive reading materials by writing and illustrating texts. A key advantage of these materials is that because they are created by students' own classmates, the texts are likely to meet two criteria for extensive reading materials: comprehensibility and interest. Dupuy and McQuillan provide guidelines for the writing, illustrating, and publishing of the Handcrafted Books, as well as an example book.

 

Rane-Szostak, D. (1997). Extensive Reading and Loneliness in Later Life. In Jacobs, G. M., Davis, C., & Renandya, W. A. (Eds.). Successful strategies for extensive reading. (pp. 181-186) Singapore: SEAMEO Regional Language Centre.

220--**In Chapter 17, Donna Rane-Szostak explores the reasons why studies show that older people in the US who read extensively do not appear to suffer the loneliness often associated with our later years. She believes that extensive reading provides them with a feeling of competence, purpose, and enhanced self-esteem. While the other chapters in this book discuss extensive reading for children and young adults, this final chapter points out that extensive reading provides benefits for one's entire life. Thus, Rane-Szostak further motivates those of us working with the young to guide them to become life-long readers, and reminds us not to neglect our own reading habits.